BLOG: The loudness wars

The loudness wars

Serus, 

We all know what the loudness wars are, so I won't talk about that. 

Instead, I want us to reflect on the necessity of making a record as loud as possible. 

In the recent years, Spotify, iTunes and the like introduced a feature that has the application analyze every song that's played, adjusting the playback volume according to it's perceived loudness (someone correct me if I'm wrong, please). This means that if you play a track that was squashed in mastering, followed by one that was treated nicely, the former one will sound weaker and quieter than the latter. 

Ian Shepherd, mastering engineer extraordinaire, educator and creator of the Dynamic Range Day, uploaded a video showcasing how detrimental over-compressing a song is to how it's perceived. This applies even more in light of the information presented in the previous paragraph. 
 

Metallica's Death Magnetic


There are certain albums, such as Metallica's Death Magnetic that have been ruined by the mastering process, because of the band/producer wanting it to be mastered as loud as possible.
Famously, the band released the album for Guitar Hero (video game), and the songs were not square-waved there. Fans proceeded to download that version from torrenting websites. 

This was less of an educational blog post and more of a 'these are my hopes and dreams' one. 

If you want to know more about the loudness wars and about Dynamic Range Day, visit the website dedicated to it. 
 

How do you feel about over-compRESSING MUSIC? LET US KNOW IN THE COMMENTS BELOW
 

Have a good one.
- Tiki